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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 379 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30pm EST
. so, before the mobile phone only to technologies had spread as widely as the mobile phone. no technology has spread as rapidly as the mobile phone. the only other recent one was the transistor radio and before that, it was fired to spread as wildly. so, what is the -- we know what it means in our lives and what smart phones been and all that but what does it mean for the majority of the world's population. it was built highways, communication highways and labor never connected before. in afghanistan we talk about story that you asked about entrepreneurs and was responsible for creating the afghan cell phone company. this is the biggest story in afghanistan and the last ten years. we don't hear about it. why? because the fact that more afghans today have access and know how to read or write, when a decade ago they would have had to walk 700 miles to make a phone call. but that's not a story. what is a story? it is a big story. i would imagine it is something that means a lot to them in terms of their key devotees. but what is even more exciting, you think about when we buil
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 4:30pm PST
in the 1960s to help dockworkers displaced by technology, the port alliance says these days those royalties serve as a bonus to workers, not a safety net. but the union disagrees saying the payments still help compensate workers for lost job opportunities. florida is home to almost a third of the ports that would be affected by the potential strike, governor rick scott says he's still thinks a deal will be reached, but if it doesn't he's counting on washington to step in. allison worrell, "n.b.r.," fort lauderdale, florida. >> susie: volatility was the word of the day here on wall street. investors were fixated on the war of words in washington over the fiscal cliff, and shrugged off some encouraging news today about jobs. fewer americans filed for jobless benefits last week: new claims fell 12,000 to 350,000. but the labor department says the christmas holiday may have distorted the numbers, as some state offices were closed monday and tuesday and could not provide data. in the markets, the volatility index, or what's often called the "fear index," jumped to its highest level since last su
FOX Business
Dec 26, 2012 3:00pm EST
disappointing data. well, technology shares under pressure, especially the large cap names. the selling could be due to uncertainty on a budget deal and folks just wanting to lock in gains, potentially, of course, before taxes on capital gains go up next year. maybe not such a surprise. check out the spider select technology fund, an etf, exposure to the likes of, yes, app 8, and soft -- apple, and software makers and stocks. xlk, the name, and it's dropping. apple, of course, look at what apple's doing, down today, about 1%, but it is up 27% this year. google moving higher. microsoft and ebay lower today, especially ebay down, well, nearly a buck today on the trade. all right, so about, oh, about 47 minutes left of trading on the day after christmas. the markets still trying to get back to the water mark. they are now down about six points after briefly getting above in positive territory. tech stocks the worst. case index showing home prices on the rise, a good thing. check in on how this moves the markets, if at all, nicole's on the new york stock exchange, and jeff flock at the cme. nicol
MSNBC
Dec 26, 2012 12:00pm PST
's legacy. how are you, sir? >> good morning. >> i'm interested in how technology can revive the dream. let's talk about post partisan ways to use technology to change a lot of the problems we have. >> let's talk about that. everybody agrees that only growth can give us the american dream again and balance the budget. >> how? >> the key to any successful economy in the world today is to have widespread broadband, lots of that internet you were just talking about and very, very cheep and clean energy. if we can move the economy very, very rapidly to cheep and clean energy and to very widespread broadband, we will have the platform on which rapid economic growth will be possible. >> you made the me think about a guest we had a couple of weeks ago. ray was brilliant and talked a lot about the singularity and the future where man and machine and technology will be much more merged than we are now. technology will allow it to do things that are unimaginable at this point. do you foresee that future where technology becomes part of the body and allows it to go to another level. >> the most exciti
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:30am EST
and technology? >> it's a good question, and it's one that comes up all the time. and i think the important thing to recognize is, you know, people -- when the airplane came along, okay, the framers had no idea there would be air travel like that. probably except for jefferson. [laughter] but he wasn't around when they were writing the constitution. so does that mean that the commerce clause doesn't apply to air travel? of course not. the principles that the framers meant to establish in the commerce clause certainly can readily be applied to evolving commerce. the court doesn't always get this right. i mean, for example, when wiretaps first came up, you know, when the framers wrote the fourth amendment about searches and seizures, they didn't envisions wiretaps, and the first decision was, well, the fourth amendment momentum apply o this. but it became pretty clear pretty quickly that allowing people to intercept private conversations constituted the same sort of search and seizure of material that the framers want to protect. so you try to find, at least i do -- different judges approach these
KCSMMHZ
Dec 24, 2012 5:30pm PST
year. the japan electronics and information technology industries association said that worldwide production of mobile phones will rise 12% next year to $245 billion. that's as an increasing number of people switch to smartphones from regular mobile phones. but production by japanese makers, that will grow only by 1% to $17 billion. their share in the global market is expected to decline to 7% from the current 8%. japanese makers have been struggling to make inroads to the global market where apple and south korea's samsung remains strong. >>> the japanese are making use of the digital technologies to tap into the skin care market. fuji 2 uses a smartphone to analyze the condition of a person's skin. users place a sheet called a color reference chart alongside their face and take photos with smartphones that have special software inside. it compares the skin with their chart. it rates the user's skin condition. they say the data are uploaded and stored to help users and cosmetics companies to choose suitable skin care products and treatments. meanwhile, sony has utilized its digit
CNBC
Dec 23, 2012 11:00pm EST
brush movements than manual brushes and even up to 50% more than leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. [ticking] >> there's no spitting or anything, so no one knows you're doing it. >> he uses a product called snus, a big new idea in smokeless tobacco, and the tobacco companies are banking on it. >> thank you. >> it was started in sweden, where it's getting credit for helping people quit smoking, even though it keeps them addicted to nicotine what sweden has done is traded one addiction for another addiction. >> that's true. addiction is a problem, but it's less of a problem than lung cancer. [ticking] >> its inventor and investors say it will change the way we power our homes, bypassing the traditional electric grid. is the bloom box intended to get rid of the grid? >> the bloom box is intended to replace the grid for its customers. [ticking] >> let's say if you spilled something on it... >> marty cooper looks on all this with pride, amusement, and some dismay. >> when i throw this against the wall, you
SFGTV2
Dec 24, 2012 6:00am PST
: in terms of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water
CNBC
Dec 24, 2012 5:00am EST
their christmas tree. just as technology gradually consumes more of our wealth, toymakers are increasingly weaving it into a child's play experience, using touch screens, apps and built in technology. >> as technology becomes more prevalent in the home, children are instantly drawn to what parents have. the ipad is becoming a family purchase. >> but luckily, there are simpler openings out there driving the market. >> we have seen a lot of lovely toys today, haven't we, hannah? >> yeah. >> what is your favorite toy that you've seen here? >> the dollies. >> the dollies? >> parents will notice a lot of old favorites coming back with a money day twist. so is this a reflection of the bearish times we're living in or is it a wishful remembrance of christmas past? >> legos has always been a retrotoy. but yes, during tough times, people come back to tried and true brands and brands they know have great play value. >> wonderful 2013 products that will probably sneak into the market this christmas. it's turtles. and that was another retrovoid coming back. but companies have to be innovated, they have to kee
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:00am EST
for the suggestion. we have about 25 minutes left. we'll come back and talk with jason pontin of the "mit technology review." the subject is about solving big problems in america. we'll take your calls in a moment. [video clip] >> the british admirals and generals were reporting to the crown that the colonists were sending ships everywhere to try to get ammunition and muskets and cannons. this was after the british had sent more troops to boston after the boston tea party and it's clear the colonists were pulling together the ammunition and cannons. the king basically prohibited british ships from taking ammunition and everything to the colonies unless it was officially sanctioned. they were very alert to this. as soon as the collins found out about the order in new hampshire and rhode island, they took the ammunition so everybody knew it was coming in the winter of 77 for-1775 -- in the winter of 1774-1775. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are focusing on the "mit technology review." we are talking about big problems in the world. we will get to this coverage in just a second. this is ja
FOX Business
Dec 28, 2012 6:00pm EST
that low capital gains tax rates are crucial for a growth of economy and entrepreneurship and high-technology industries. gerri: so what if we compare favorably with a lot of developed countries out there -- what would be the practical effect? >> it will slow the flow of venture capital and investment for high-technology companies. if you think about every major high-tech company like apple or microsoft or ebay or amazon, they were all nurtured by high income people putting money in early on to these startup companies. we dramatically cut the capital gains tax rate from 40% to 20% before, so what we are going to do is kill america's entrepreneurial economy. gerri: let's get into the details of this. why you would want to keep these capital gains taxes low. you say it is an issue of double taxation. >> that's right. corporate profits are taxed at the corporate level. and they are taxed again at the individual level. with the dividend and capital gains taxes. george bush, to his credit, tried to do something about that and he chopped the dividend and capital gains tax down to 15%. the effect of
FOX Business
Dec 25, 2012 7:00pm EST
, the source of all of our technology and ultimately our military power and potential for growth and we are ttling into over the pale, everybody in silicon view is angling for green subsidies and it is a tragedy. lou: that tragedy compounded by the fact the money that has been spent by this administration if you will on venture money like solyndra has been disastrous. >> they are twisting our venture capitalist, turning people like john doerr into a blithering idiot. john seeking government subsidies. he now wants us to support him rather than him to support the country with wonderful new companies like intel. lou: john is being adaptive to new realities. the primary source of the capital, he is turning to it, i suppose. i want to turn to this book, "the israel test." you take up the issue of the world civilization, importance of israel within it. as a capitalist as well as jewish state. you really believe that israel is that strong, that important in the world's future? >> i certainly do. the american economy is heavily dependent on israel today, partly because of the debauchery of sil
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
that companies that try to be innovative are not innovative. well, our technology leaders, the people who really inspired me, they were inspired by these wonderful things happening. i'm going to focus on a little period of time. as short as four years, maybe six or seven. it is that time that orville wright and his brother took off. the world realized -- they did not do that with photoshop. since that first flight, the people who had taken a flight could sit in that first wrote and only three of you would have taken a turn. we did not even have the internet. can you imagine? going from that -- they were building 500 airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not help -- we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the move
FOX News
Dec 29, 2012 11:00am PST
eye on 2016. okay, when we come back, from energy to education, to technology. our panel's pick for the good news story of the year. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> well, just when you thought there wasn't that much to cheer
FOX News
Dec 29, 2012 8:00pm PST
energy. >> basically we have through technology, the united states has discovered it has a huge amount of both shell oil and shell gas, and it can get it out of the ground. as i say thanks to technology. and that's not just a u.s. story. it is a north american story. there was a ton of oil in canada. there is the same geological formations in mexico. there is a lot of energy that can come upe'. the ceo of flor says there is at least $30 billion of potential c projects around the u.s. gulf of mexico. >> u people say by 2020 we could be self-sufficient in terms of providing most of the oil and the gas we get domestically. what are the implications of this for the larger economy? things like manufacturing and consumer prices? >> certainly obviously residential heating and things like that would be more affordable and make us more competitive and manufacturing and that has to do with exports. we could actually become the leading producer energy for the emerging markets. energy demand in this country is going down, but in the rest of thegy world it is going up. this would be any senator mus
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:40am EST
do you think are some of the most effective mechanisms? >> technologically, for -- well, the biggest -- the quickest thing -- our energy efficiency in the u.s. isn't -- is not very good. and we've run economic models which suggest that if we put a $10 a ton tax on carbon, increasing $10 a ton per year, so that after 10 years, it's equivalent to a dollar a gallon on gasoline. that that would reduce carbon emissions in the us by 30%. which is about 11 times -- that 30% reduction is 11 times greater than the amount of carbon carried by this keystone xl pipeline. so it just shows how foolish that pipeline is, compared to the kind of steps that we should really be taking to ensure our energy independence. but the -- there are multiple ways that price would affect -- would reduce emissions. but, yeah, i -- and i don't really know that i should or could actually specify what -- which technology is gonna do. as i say, the marketplace is going to make those decisions. but there's a lot of potential already, well california is twice as efficient as the rest of the nation. it's about equivalent
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:32pm EST
all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human side of nasa as well. i would not subscribe to that kind of recommendation. >> lower the emphasis a bit. >> making a distinction between science and exploration, nasa is more than just a science agency, it is an exploration agency, a tool of u.s. farm policy. just looking at sites as defined in the service, it is realistic for. the reason why you do human in part is for exploring the unknown, but putting people in an unusual or alien situation. you learn things you would not learn if he stayed at home. there is a wonderful example looking at someone -- and viruses and how they become changed in space. this means there is a gene sequencing issue. if we can figure out how to control but, we could have a potential vaccine for salmonella. that is not the thing that would emerge into a ground based laboratory. it emerges might put people in a very different environment to go into the unknown. human space flight is probably the m
FOX Business
Dec 27, 2012 8:00pm EST
looking at a letter sense out today by committee of science, space and technology, they are talking about a man in department of energy, running the loan gar abty program who was using private e-mail accounts and office of science and technology, technology officer there conducting business with a private e-mail account, how widespread do you believe this is? >> you have to say how many places is this the being used. and there is no doubt that people are trying to use it to avoid compliance with the freedom of information act. that is absolutely unacceptable. we have to find out how widespreaddis it. how many accounts are being used. different accounts traps a number -- perhaps a number of accounts by the same person, we have to assure this is not being used to avoid compliance with the law, transparency is for important not only to us but to american citizens this is not done, that is something we're not going to let go of until we get to the bottom of it. tom. i hope not, people said why are people not held accountable for their actions? are -- forgive me, i do not know the procedure or
CNBC
Dec 26, 2012 5:00am EST
are in companies investing in. >> when i was a corporate analyst in india tracking markets, technology was considered the engine of growth for the country and one of the bright spots for the market. is technology still one of the areas you are tell clients to invest in in india, or what are the sectors you're looking at? >> i think there's two sectors whether you look at india, china, or asia. there's two sectors we like. it's technology, as you said. i think that's one that -- it's a bright gem. you know, it went from, in india, from a bpo outsourcing business and has grown to an innovation business where brands are being developed and real technological gains are being had. the other sector we like is health care. the demand for health care in these markets is just continuing to grow steadily. obviously people are having longer lives, having more disposable income for health care and treatment. and so those are two sectors we really like. >> okay. and curious, as an emerging market investor, how closely are you watching the fiscal cliff negotiations here in the u.s., the debt crisis
MSNBC
Dec 29, 2012 5:00am PST
a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. >>> hello from new york, i'm chris can hayes heave with richard wolffe and the great heather mcgee, carl smith, the university of north carolina chapel hill, contributor to a blog. and socket sony, the migrant workers advocacy group. the latest gdp provisions looks like the economy may finally genuinely be in a real recovery. it increased by 3.1%. of course, we've been here before many times over the past four years and each time it appears that the economy is going to achieve a philosophy, it gets pulled back to earth. there are two issues. cyclical, how and when we will once achieve full employment and strong growth and structural issues, what aspects do the fundamentals of our country work and not work. barack obama has insisted it won't be enough to cover the downturn and the economy needs fundamental reform and invention. >> i know that we'll have to overcome our doubts and our divisions and we're going t
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:00am EST
in motion control technology, with a thriving defense unit, a $2.5 billion company that employs 8,400 people, takes a major hit. that's >> i encourage my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to spend last time and instead pass a -- family, seniors, and small business owners. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired, for what purpose does the gentlewoman from florida rise? without objection. ms. wilson: today is new year's eve. while we debate going over the fiscal cliff, there are some people in america planning to shoot their guns in celebration at midnight. put down those guns. millions of people have died or been injured due to this custom. put down those guns. if i were in my district of miami today, i would be participating in a press conference that we started 10 years ago calling an end to this deadly custom. as a result, celebratory gunfire has largely disappeared from our county. it is a result of repeated demands and media events over and over again. now people get it. remember, what goes up must come down. bullets are no excep
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 10:00am EST
this was not impersonal market forces, this was not technology, this was not globalization. what was happening was american politics and american economics were working against the middle class. people did this. we decided this. if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape. they've done better trading against the world, their companies are making money. so a lot of the things we heard that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wo
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
into the early 21st century, the confidence has given way to doubt. technologically newer forms of travel especially airplanes and rocket-propelled capsules provide the sense of extreme danger that had faded during the relatively safer nineteentnineteent h century. equally, it's now clear that imperialism had smoothed the way from early circumnavigate is under political and social conditions that would be unwise and unjust to perpetuate let alone re-create. above all there is a growing sense of the planet as beginning to fight back or shrug us off. that that was environment the cost of planetary dominatiodominatio n that had begun to haunt us. we live with all three legacies of around the world travel, every emerging fear that the planet could simply shrugged this off, continuing confidence if we might be able to generate technology and political alliances to dominate the planet but doubt that it is always wise to dominate it in that way. is especially apparent that the characteristic confidence of the long 19th century was the shortest of planetary experiences. yet it has been the most d
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:45pm EST
war and it's particularly true of the navy is it six kind of on a technological point in american history things had been changing for some time. the power comes in and the railroads already expanding across the continent but the application of the large-scale warfare in the civil war is one of the first cases where we see that. now the land war probably arguably at least is the most immediate impact was the shoulder muskett which dramatically extended their range the soldiers could fight and at sea there are a number of similarly important technological changes. obviously there is steam that had been around for a generation or more with the application, the universal both on the blockade and those attempting to run the blockade rifled guns just as muskets in the field armies and the artillery extended their range and accuracy thereby hiding elevating the impact of the war ships over the guns ashore going into the civil war. the general motion was turned guns ashore are going to defeat them afloat every time mainly because they don't sink. but with the new rifle ordinance and expl
ABC
Dec 26, 2012 2:40am PST
with the brand new electronics you just unwrapped. our technology editor is here with how to get the best use out of all that gear. >> knowing me, when i open one of those, i'm the first to scratch it, drop it, break it. >>> first, we want to get to some of this news. major damage after strong storms swept through the gulf states. at least three people have died, dozens more are injured from texas to georgia. >> and the news could be getting worse. that storm is moving east with strong winds and snow. winter watches and warnings are posted in 21 states, from texas all the way to maine, including blizzard warnings in seven of those states. our coverage begins with abc's brad wheelis. >> oh, my god, look, that's a tornado. >> reporter: this twister slammed into downtown mobile, alabama, injuring several people. vast swaths of this city were suddenly dark, leaving 17,000 homes and businesses without power. emergency crews blocked roads to better assess the damage, while the rain continued to pour on the city. >> oh, jesus, look at that tornado. >> reporter: another of the more than a dozen tornadoes
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 7:15am EST
. that was because western societies degenerate technology and political networks that seem to have conquered the glow. at this point is not only possible to go around the world but it has become a popular pastime. representations of doing a circumnavigation became playful, enticing, even joyous. there were costs, not all of them hidden but they seem to be outweighed by the glories of making an easy swing of around the planet. over the 20th century and out into the early 21st century, the confidencconfidenc e has given way to doubt. technological new forms of travel, special airplanes and rocket propelled space capsules, extreme danger that faded during the relatively safe 19th century equal, it's now clear that imperialism has smooth the way for most further circumnavigators under political and social conditions that would be unwise and unjust to perpetuate let alone read create. above all there's a growing sense the planet is again beginning to fight back or shrug us off. now off. now that environment across of planetary domination has begun to haunt us. we live with all three legacies of a
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 9:05pm EST
effective mechanisms? >> technologically, for -- well, the biggest -- the quickest thing -- our energy efficiency in the u.s. isn't -- is not very good. and we've run economic models which suggest that if we put a $10 a ton tax on carbon, increasing $10 a ton per year, so that after 10 years, it's equivalent to a dollar a gallon on gasoline. that that would reduce carbon emissions in the us by 30%. which is about 11 times -- that 30% reduction is 11 times greater than the amount of carbon carried by this keystone xl pipeline. so it just shows how foolish that pipeline is, compared to the kind of steps that we should really be taking to ensure our energy independence. but the -- there are multiple ways that price would affect -- would reduce emissions. but, yeah, i -- and i don't really know that i should or could actually specify what -- which technology is gonna do. as i say, the marketplace is going to make those decisions. but there's a lot of potential already, well california is twice as efficient as the rest of the nation. it's about equivalent to europe, which is also twice as e
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 7:00pm PST
it was a test of a ballistic missile technology and was in violation of u.n. security council resolutions. >>> china has opened what it calls the world's longest high speed rail line linking the capital of beijing with guan jo in the south. here's more. >> reporter: the first high-speed train from beijing is about to leave the railway station. many passengers are carrying coats because the temperature in beijing is about 20 degrees centigrade lower than here. the new line stretches nearly 2300 kilometers, including a section already in service. the trip between the two cities will take about eight hours instead of the current 20 1/2 hours. china says it developed the high-speed train line on its own. based on the technology used by japan's train. the launch of the new service expands china's high-speed railway to more than 9300 kilometers. officials plan to extend it to 16,000 kilometers by 2020. the chinese government temporarily suspended construction of high-speed train lines after 40 people died in a two-train collision last year. but it has resumed construction with the aim of helpin
SFGTV2
Dec 24, 2012 3:00pm PST
, even in the face of all these technology companies that are coming here and helping us uplift our economy, even within that success, you hear me talking about the people who aren't getting those jobs, the people who are making decisions everyday in our streets, in our community, and i will not be mincing words -- it is in the bay view. in in the visitation valley. it is in the mission where their dispute resolution is at the end of a gun and this is the way they're talking. this is the way they're dealing with each other and then with anybody who attempts to interfere with that. you have heard me say even with the success of all of our departments and everything that they're doing i can't give a job to a dead youth no matter what we do, and so i can have the best training programs. i can have a high number of jobs available. eric mcdonald and i can create 10,000 jobs in the summer, but if our youth are resolving their differences with the point of a gun or the end of a knife those jobs are never going to be available to them. how do we interrupt that violence? i cannot put i
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 7:00pm EST
install the systems. as a lover of history, i know he would've been talk of this new technology as a way of keeping an accurate record of events for the memoir he planned to write after leaving office. after the bay of pigs, people say he wanted to be able to remember who said what in case they later changed their tune. [laughter] the wonderful thing about this book is that although much of this material has been available, it has not been easily acceptable until now. the original recordings of of varying quality, and it is not always clear who is speaking in meetings. working with our outstanding archivist, historian ed widmer did an extraordinary job. in election season, i find it fascinating to listen to my father talk about what kind of person succeeds in politics. he believed the time for changing, and he was right for the time. it is interesting to apply his standards to the current campaign. he talks about the odds of people with money succeeding in politics and about whether objects come to play. find his standards to today, i know where i come down. i encourage you to make up yo
FOX News
Dec 23, 2012 7:00pm PST
? and a technology suite with bluetooth, navigation and other handy stuff? yeahthat would be cool. introducing the all-new nissan sentra. it's our most innovative sentra ever. nissan. innovation that excites. now get a $169-per-month lease on a 2013 nissan sentra. ♪ on a 2013 nissan sentra. let'for an idea.s - a grand idea called america. the idea that if you work hard, if you have a dream, if you work with your neighbors... you can do most anything. this led to other ideas like lerty and rock 'n' roll. to free markets, free enterprise, and free refills. it put a man on the moon and a phone in your pocket. our country's gone through a lot over the centuries and a half. but this idea isn't fragile. when times get tough, it rallies us as one. every day, more people believe in the american idea and when they do, the dream comes true. we're grateful to be a part of it. clusters of pustules, pimples. i had this shingle rash right next to my spine. the soreness was excruciating. it was impossible to even thi about dancing. when you're dancing, your partner is holding you. so, his hand would have b
FOX News
Dec 25, 2012 3:00pm PST
to amputation and traumatic brain injuries forced the medical field an technology to evolve and how the technology is now serving the newly injured war fighter. peck has had 29 surgeries in 2.5 years. >> can't keep up. >> now he lives on a wooded patch of land with his mom lisa in rural virginia. two weeks ago, independence fund gave john a new lease on life and chance to do something that standard wheelchair can't do. head outside and offroad. in to the forest where many of the warriors grew up hunting and fishing. peck drives something known as track chair, new technology developed bay cuple in minnesota that allows the wheelchair to function like all-terrain vehicle. >> i used to ride atvs. i guess i would consider this a tank. >> 27-year-old john peck looks like a boy given his first bmx bike for christmas. >> whee! my darkest fears? was my divorce. >> his young wife left him. >> she couldn't hang with the injuries. she wanted to move forward for me being 6-foot tall and having muscles and everything like that. once i got injured she hung it up. i was a very angry and spiteful p
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